Dragon*Con redux part I: My Con history

9 09 2009

Star Trek Experience
  

Originally uploaded by N-Sai

The wonderful magical microsociety of Dragon*Con, contained entirely within the mazelike confines of three connected hotels and one satellite a few blocks away, is something I think everyone should experience once. Do it, if only to get in touch with your inner geek and your secret furry. Everyone has one lurking inside, I like to think. There has to be a part of you that yearns to don a cape and prance around as if you were faster than a speeding bullet and able to leap freight trains in a single bound. If you don’t, you’re probably not much fun to be around anyway.

I remember being an outsider who had never been to a Con save for a couple Star Trek conventions when I was a preteen. It was all for research I was doing for a class, mind you. I remember stuffing myself into the circa-1970s orange bleachers inside the Phoenix Veterans Memorial Coliseum so I could listen to Garrett Wang from Star Trek: Voyager, and John DeLancey, who played Q in Star Trek: The Next Generation. I found both actors’ schpiels to be engaging and expected such from all cons afterward.

I also had high expectations from having seen “Star Trek: The Experience” at the Las Vegas Hilton hotel, long before the forces of economy and practicality took away one of these old holdovers from Sin City’s drunken flirtations with family-friendliness, whimsy and imagination.

Having long ago left my preteen years in another galaxy, seeing these geeks (an affectionate term) standing on the train platform took me back to those geeky days of my youth when I used to thumb through an encyclopedia of information about “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” There was a time when I could describe the plot of every episode in great detail and tell you all about the various quirks and life stories of each character. I don’t know what happened to that part of me, but I don’t have it anymore and I kind of want it back. Looking at these current-day con lovers made me wish I was one of them. Not to mention that marveling at powerful superheroes’ ordinary means of transit made me laugh. Hard.

Another thing that’s important to consider is that Labor Day weekend is a busy one in Atlanta, and it’s a time when you might find yourself with a decked-out football fanatic on one side and a storm trooper on the other. One year I passed the time on my 45-minute trip intown by making interesting conversation with a chatty pirate’s wench. She had a lot to say about piracy and about life in general. I wished I’d had the gumption to capture that moment on film.

At some point, I’d seen enough of this fantastic tomfoolery and decided I had to be part of it. I decided to give it a shot. The journey began by standing in line for about an hour to buy tickets onsite. Lucky me, I could by a second year’s membership to Dragon*Con for just $10 more (or some ridiculous sum like that). So I did, and by that point, I was locked in for two years of this wonderful nonsense.

My first year at Dragon*Con, I approached the scene with a lot of trepidation. I went by myself into the wild and wooly crowd, armed with a camera and the excuse that I was just a journalist passing through. I told myself, “This year I’m just documenting a scene.” I opted to remain a detached observer of the absurdity around me.

My second year was the best. I had a plan. I even brought an iReport kit with me and interviewed people. With the help of coworkers and friends, I saw quite a bit of things and had lots of fun. Not to mention, I took way too many pictures. Afterward, I made my television debut talking about the event with a viking hat on.

My third year’s expedition to Dragon*Con was predated by an exhausting run through San Diego Comic-Con, which is a totally different animal and yet much the same. The focus is on comics primarily and it’s about twice as big, but not necessarily as cool or fun. I think at some point I just got a little tired. I realized that the Con experience has its limits. I look forward to it, and at the same time, I know that I will be fatigued and frustrated by it.

I’ll want to kick myself, but I’ll go to another con, and I’ll enjoy it. That’s the way it goes. After all the lines and crowds and odoriffic science fiction costumes around you, the memories are what remain.

It’s a unique thing, something you can’t really get anywhere else, and a surreal exploration of that part of us that still likes to dress up and pretend to be someone else. I hope that we can all dig deep and find it within ourselves, even if we wouldn’t be caught dead in Spandex.





What I’m working on programmingwise

5 05 2008

Outputting MySQL records using AJAX to update the display without reloading the whole page.Adding records to the MySQL database using a simple form and some PHP.

You might hear me talking about “my sequel” and other things. No, I’m not working on yet ANOTHER sequel to Harry & Kumar go to White Castle. So relax. What I’m talking about is MySQL, an open-source database Thingy that I am toying with. It is something that comes with the territory of my GoDaddy hosting account, so I thought I’d play with it. This entails learning the PHP scripting language to access it and manipulate it via the outside world and the Internetwebs, and in turn includes stirring in many other technologies. Bundled together, they are referred to as Ajax. Javascript, XML, and more.

Isn’t it geeky?

The screencaps above show you the program I’m working on. Simple stuff. Add a record, display it. The cool thing is this is pretty much how other software, such as WordPress, etc., works at its core. You make a new record in a database every time you plug in a blog entry, such as I’m about to do now.

My dream, my goal, only not quite, is to devise (on my own and by Frankensteining a number of techniques) a streamlined interface for information sharing that I can play with. I haven’t yet figured out what it will be, but I hope it’s something that I can employ to automate certain tasks, as well as use at home and in my personal life to display information simply and elegantly. I don’t know how far I’ll get on this project, but it’s a fun way to learn, regardless.





Getting to know the Mac a little better…

18 04 2008

Out of Box ExperienceI’ve written a bit in other places about how I now use a MacBook Standard at home and how weird it is. It turns out that I enjoy this system a lot, but figuring out the Jobsian way of doing things (oh, OK, I drag the mouse and that scans through the photos. OK.) is creating a bit of a learning curve. There’s a few semantics, too, but I’m getting there. The system pretty much can be used at its most basic level with little or no extra learning effort, but mastering all the cute little media applications is a bit trickier.

Today I created a short sound clip of trumpet fanfare using GarageBand. It did a good job of approximating the musical notes (looking over them, they appeared to be for a far better song than I had done.) It’s cool that a computer would include a music-making app. It’s a nice touch. I hope people will learn how to use this software and make their own music instead of ripping copyrighted material. One must, however question the placement of the (only two) USB ports on the left side instead of the right, as well as the lack of anything beyond the most basic features and OH WELL these things aren’t that big of a deal. They’re part of the Mac experience. Coming off a gi-normous HP laptop with every bell and whistle imaginable, including a TV tuner, I’m going to have to, uh, make do with less. But… using the new computer and system has been an overall pleasant experience.

Now, I have a newer computer at work, too, and the process of migrating everything over created a couple rough spots, methinks, but it will be totally awesome once that’s resolved. Hey, no one said progress was easy.